Loading...
Loading...
Sun, wind and sustainability: Learning from the Warrnambool Case Study

Sun, wind and sustainability: Learning from the Warrnambool Case Study

During a year that has given us such a collective pause to reappraise the world we live in and our footprints within it, we have largely reinvigorated and reinvested in our climate change efforts. There is more momentum with decarbonisation, clean energies and the power of hydrogen than ever before.

With this momentum and newfound widespread recognition, there is also acknowledgement that we have to build-out our new infrastructures in the right way. Right, first time. That means green hydrogen; using renewable resources like wind and solar to provide the power to create that green fuel. For many countries around the world, it will be a case of utilising their natural resources or inherent advantages in the first instance, and adapting the business model thereafter. Being at one with nature and the respective resources at our disposal, in the very name of preserving and co-existing with it.

Perhaps there have been clues for some time pointing us in this direction. Sir Isaac Newton is widely quoted as having once said, “Nature is pleased with simplicity. And nature is no dummy.” Likewise, Albert Einstein is also credited as having said, “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” There are many other notable quotes and proverbs around the use of our environment and natural resources and most importantly, understanding and respecting it. Here’s another, attributed to Frank Lloyd Wright, “Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.”

All of these seem relevant today when we talk of the flourishing hydrogen movement and the potential it has to underpin our future industries and societies. Look deep into nature and understand what we have available to us; keep it simple and use the wind and sun that we have in abundance to create the sustainable future fuel we so need; and perhaps in staying close to nature in this way, we’ll have a clean and green hydrogen society to rely upon for decades to come.

... to continue reading you must be subscribed

Subscribe Today

To gain access to this article and all our other content, you will need to subscribe to H2 View.

From the latest print editions, to 24/7 online access to exclusive interviews, authoritative columnists and the H2 View news archive, a subscription is the best way for you to stay up to date with developments in the hydrogen community.

Please wait...