Scientists find cheaper way to make hydrogen energy out of water

Scientists from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney, Australia have demonstrated a much cheaper and sustainable way to create hydrogen required to power cars.

In research published in Nature Communications recently, scientists from UNSW, Griffith University and Swinburne University of Technology showed that capturing hydrogen by splitting it from oxygen in water can be achieved by using low-cost metals like iron and nickel as catalysts, which speed up this chemical reaction while requiring less energy.

Iron and nickel, which are found in abundance on Earth, would replace precious metals ruthenium, platinum and iridium that up until now are regarded as benchmark catalysts in the ‘water-splitting’ process.

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